The 2000 revision of the Declaration of Helsinki: a step forward or more confusion?

@article{Forster2001The2R,
  title={The 2000 revision of the Declaration of Helsinki: a step forward or more confusion?},
  author={Heidi P Forster and E. Emanuel and C. Grady},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2001},
  volume={358},
  pages={1449-1453}
}
At a time when there was great attention and intense public controversy surrounding clinical (especially multinational) research, the 52nd general assembly of the World Medical Association (WMA) adopted the 5th revision of the Declaration of Helsinki (in October, 2000)-available at www.wma.net. These revisions are the most substantial adaptations since those adopted by the 29th WMA assembly in October, 1975. The commitment to revision of the declaration acknowledged that deficiencies and… Expand
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