• Corpus ID: 21117811

The 1727 St Kilda epidemic: smallpox or chickenpox?

@article{Stride2009The1S,
  title={The 1727 St Kilda epidemic: smallpox or chickenpox?},
  author={Peter Stride},
  journal={The journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh},
  year={2009},
  volume={39 3},
  pages={
          276-9
        }
}
  • P. Stride
  • Published 1 September 2009
  • Medicine
  • The journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
An acute infectious epidemic almost eliminated the St Kilda community in 1727. An epic tale of survival in adversity followed. Contemporary records reveal atypical features, suggesting a speculative alternative. 
2 Citations

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