The 'evolvability' of promiscuous protein functions

@article{Aharoni2005TheO,
  title={The 'evolvability' of promiscuous protein functions},
  author={Amir Aharoni and Leonid Gaidukov and Olga Khersonsky and Stephen McQ Gould and Cintia Roodveldt and Dan S. Tawfik},
  journal={Nature Genetics},
  year={2005},
  volume={37},
  pages={73-76}
}
How proteins with new functions (e.g., drug or antibiotic resistance or degradation of man-made chemicals) evolve in a matter of months or years is still unclear. This ability is dependent on the induction of new phenotypic traits by a small number of mutations (plasticity). But mutations often have deleterious effects on functions that are essential for survival. How are these seemingly conflicting demands met at the single-protein level? Results from directed laboratory evolution experiments… Expand
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