The “worm” programs—early experience with a distributed computation

@article{Shoch1982TheP,
  title={The “worm” programs—early experience with a distributed computation},
  author={John F. Shoch and Jon A. Hupp},
  journal={Commun. ACM},
  year={1982},
  volume={25},
  pages={172-180}
}
The “worm” programs were an experiment in the development of distributed computations: programs that span machine boundaries and also replicate themselves in idle machines. A “worm” is composed of multiple “segments,” each running on a different machine. The underlying worm maintenance mechanisms are responsible for maintaining the worm—finding free machines when needed and replicating the program for each additional segment. These techniques were successfully used to support several real… 

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