The “handwriting brain”: A meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies of motor versus orthographic processes

@article{Planton2013TheB,
  title={The “handwriting brain”: A meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies of motor versus orthographic processes},
  author={Samuel Planton and M{\'e}lanie Jucla and Franck-Emmanuel Roux and Jean-François D{\'e}monet},
  journal={Cortex},
  year={2013},
  volume={49},
  pages={2772-2787}
}
INTRODUCTION Handwriting is a modality of language production whose cerebral substrates remain poorly known although the existence of specific regions is postulated. The description of brain damaged patients with agraphia and, more recently, several neuroimaging studies suggest the involvement of different brain regions. However, results vary with the methodological choices made and may not always discriminate between "writing-specific" and motor or linguistic processes shared with other… Expand
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