The “Irukandji syndrome” and acute pulmonary oedema

@article{Fenner1988TheS,
  title={The “Irukandji syndrome” and acute pulmonary oedema},
  author={Peter J. Fenner and John A. Williamson and Kumar Gunawardane and William Murtha and Joseph W. Burnett and David M. Colquhoun and Stephen Godfrey},
  journal={Medical Journal of Australia},
  year={1988},
  volume={149}
}
Envenomation by jellyfish that cause the “Irukandji syndrome” must now be regarded as life‐threatening. Three cases are reported of acute pulmonary oedema that developed in previously‐healthy adults after envenomation by a jellyfish that produced the “Irukandji syndrome”. Direct myocardial depression and pulmonary capillary leakage are suggested as the possible causes of the acute pulmonary oedema. Probably, this is venom‐ mediated, as are the severe muscular pains and symptoms of catecholamine… Expand

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