The ‘weekend warrior’ physical activity pattern: how little is enough?

@article{Hamer2017TheW,
  title={The ‘weekend warrior’ physical activity pattern: how little is enough?},
  author={Mark Hamer and Gary O'Donovan and I-Min Lee and Emmanuel Stamatakis},
  journal={British Journal of Sports Medicine},
  year={2017},
  volume={51},
  pages={1384 - 1385}
}
The dose–response relationship between physical activity and health is of great interest to policy makers, clinicians and individuals. Several recent analyses of large-scale population data have advanced our understanding, particularly in teasing apart minimal and optimal physical activity dosage. For example, if we focus on ‘minimal’ dose, 15 min a day of moderate-intensity exercise lowered mortality in a sample of more than 400 000 adults from Taiwan.1 A recent meta-analysis of nine cohort… Expand
8 Citations
Physical Activity Patterns and Mortality: The Weekend Warrior and Activity Bouts
TLDR
Physical activity is associated with decreased mortality rate, even among those who are active 1 or 2 d·wk−1, and similar risk reductions were found when contrasting weekend warriors with those who were more frequently active. Expand
Questionnaire survey assessing the leisure-time physical activity of hospital doctors and awareness of UK physical activity recommendations
TLDR
It is suggested that hospital doctors are as active as the general public in the UK of a similar age and knowledge of specific components of the current physical activity recommendations remains poor. Expand
Is Weekend-Only Physical Activity Enough to Compensate for a Sedentary Lifestyle?
TLDR
It is appropriate for physicians and patients to expect that the FDA would require proven clinical benefits before drugs are approved, or at least rescind approval if postmarket studies do not prove that those drugs provide measurable benefits to patients, and not just to biomarkers or nonclinical end points. Expand
Is Weekend-Only Physical Activity Enough to Compensate for a Sedentary Lifestyle?
TLDR
It is appropriate for physicians and patients to expect that the FDA would require proven clinical benefits before drugs are approved, or at least rescind approval if postmarket studies do not prove that those drugs provide measurable benefits to patients, and not just to biomarkers or nonclinical end points. Expand
Five-year cost-effectiveness analysis of the European Fans in Training (EuroFIT) physical activity intervention for men versus no intervention
TLDR
The results suggest that EuroFIT can potentially improve public health in a cost-effective manner in the long term and is more effective and less expensive compared to (i.e. dominant) no intervention after 10 years. Expand
Is Weekend-Only Physical Activity Enough to Compensate for a Sedentary Lifestyle?-Reply.
This paper was accepted for publication in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine and the definitive published version is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.2386
Prospective Associations between Weekend Catch-Up Sleep, Physical Activity, and Childhood Obesity.
TLDR
This study examined the prospective associations between weekend catch-up patterns of sleep and physical activity and obesity over a 2-year period in Chinese children to explore the factors contributing to these obesogenic behavior patterns. Expand

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Weekend warrior and other leisure time physical activity patterns characterized by 1 or 2 sessions per week may be sufficient to reduce all-cause, CVD, and cancer mortality risks regardless of adherence to prevailing physical activity guidelines. Expand
The "weekend warrior" and risk of mortality.
TLDR
It is suggested that regular physical activity generating 1,000 kcal/week or more should be recommended for lowering mortality rates, among those with no major risk factors. Expand
Leisure time physical activity and mortality: a detailed pooled analysis of the dose-response relationship.
IMPORTANCE The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommended a minimum of 75 vigorous-intensity or 150 moderate-intensity minutes per week (7.5 metabolic-equivalent hours per week) ofExpand
Minimum amount of physical activity for reduced mortality and extended life expectancy: a prospective cohort study
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Benefits of a range of volumes of physical activity in a Taiwanese population between 1996 and 2008 were applicable to all age groups and both sexes, and to those with cardiovascular disease risks. Expand
Even a low-dose of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity reduces mortality by 22% in adults aged ≥60 years: a systematic review and meta-analysis
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A dose of MVPA below current recommendations reduced mortality by 22% in older adults, and a further increase in physical activity dose improved these benefits in a linear fashion. Expand
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