The ‘species recognition hypothesis’ does not explain the presence and evolution of exaggerated structures in non‐avialan dinosaurs

@article{Hone2013TheR,
  title={The ‘species recognition hypothesis’ does not explain the presence and evolution of exaggerated structures in non‐avialan dinosaurs},
  author={D. Hone and D. Naish},
  journal={Journal of Zoology},
  year={2013},
  volume={290},
  pages={172-180}
}
  • D. Hone, D. Naish
  • Published 2013
  • Biology
  • Journal of Zoology
  • The hypothesis that the exaggerated structures in various non-avialan dinosaurs (e.g. horns, crests, plates) primarily functioned in species recognition, allowing individuals of a species to recognize one another, is critically examined. While multifunctionality for many such structures is probable given extant analogues, invoking species recognition as the primary selective mechanism driving the evolution of such structures is problematic given the lack of evidence for this in extant species… CONTINUE READING

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