The α‐gal epitope and the anti‐Gal antibody in xenotransplantation and in cancer immunotherapy

@article{Galili2005TheE,
  title={The $\alpha$‐gal epitope and the anti‐Gal antibody in xenotransplantation and in cancer immunotherapy},
  author={Uri Galili},
  journal={Immunology and Cell Biology},
  year={2005},
  volume={83}
}
  • U. Galili
  • Published 1 December 2005
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Immunology and Cell Biology
The α‐gal epitope (Galα1‐3Galβ1‐(3)4GlcNAc‐R) is abundantly synthesized on glycolipids and glycoproteins of non‐primate mammals and New World monkeys by the glycosylation enzyme α1,3galactosyltransferase (α1,3GT). In humans, apes and Old World monkeys, this epitope is absent because the α1,3GT gene was inactivated in ancestral Old World primates. Instead, humans, apes and Old World monkeys produce the anti‐Gal antibody, which specifically interacts with α‐gal epitopes and which constitutes ∼1… 
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It is raised the possibility that anti‐Gal, which is highly active in patients with xenotransplants, may contribute to chronic rejection of the xenograft by binding effectively to α‐galactosyl epitopes on the Xenograft cells and inducing inflammatory reactions against the graft.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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