The "False Head" Hypothesis: Predation and Wing Pattern Variation of Lycaenid Butterflies

@inproceedings{Robbins1981TheH,
  title={The "False Head" Hypothesis: Predation and Wing Pattern Variation of Lycaenid Butterflies},
  author={Robert K. Robbins},
  year={1981}
}
  • Robert K. Robbins
  • Published 1981
  • Biology
  • Camouflage, mimicry, and other forms of deceptive appearances have presumably evolved under selective pressures from predators who hunt by sight (e.g., Cott 1940). A fascinating example of deceptive coloration is the hypothesis that the ventral wing pattern of lycaenid butterflies (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) creates an impression of a head at the posterior end of the butterfly that diverts predator attacks towards the less vulnerable end of the insect (reviewed in Robbins 1980). Predators may… CONTINUE READING

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