That is your evidence?: Classifying stance in online political debate

@article{Walker2012ThatIY,
  title={That is your evidence?: Classifying stance in online political debate},
  author={Marilyn A. Walker and Pranav Anand and Rob Abbott and Jean E. Fox Tree and Craig H. Martell and Joseph King},
  journal={Decis. Support Syst.},
  year={2012},
  volume={53},
  pages={719-729}
}
A growing body of work has highlighted the challenges of identifying the stance that a speaker holds towards a particular topic, a task that involves identifying a holistic subjective disposition. [...] Key Result Our results suggest that features and methods that take into account the dialogic context of such posts improve accuracy.Expand
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