• Corpus ID: 119360301

Texture and composition of Titan's equatorial region inferred from Cassini SAR inversion: Implications for aeolian transport at Saturn's largest moon

@article{Lucas2017TextureAC,
  title={Texture and composition of Titan's equatorial region inferred from Cassini SAR inversion: Implications for aeolian transport at Saturn's largest moon},
  author={Antoine S. Lucas and S{\'e}bastien Rodriguez and Florentin Lemonnier and Alice Le Gall and Cecile Ferrari and Philippe Paillou and Cl{\'e}ment Narteau},
  journal={arXiv: Earth and Planetary Astrophysics},
  year={2017}
}
Sand seas on Titan may reflect the present and past climatic conditions. Understanding the morphodynamics and physico-chemical properties of Titan's dunes is therefore essential for a better comprehension of the climatic and geological history of the largest Saturn's moon. We derived quantitatively surface properties (texture, composition) from the modelling of microwave backscattered signal and Monte-Carlo inversion of despeckled Cassini/SAR data over sand sea. We show that dunes and… 
1 Citations

Geological Evolution of Titan's Equatorial Regions: Possible Nature and Origin of the Dune Material

In 13 years, infrared observations from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer onboard Cassini provided significant hints about the spectral and geological diversity of Titan's surface. The

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