Texting while driving using Google Glass™: Promising but not distraction-free.

@article{He2015TextingWD,
  title={Texting while driving using Google Glass™: Promising but not distraction-free.},
  author={Jibo He and William Choi and Jason S. McCarley and Barbara S. Chaparro and Chun Wang},
  journal={Accident; analysis and prevention},
  year={2015},
  volume={81},
  pages={
          218-29
        }
}
Texting while driving is risky but common. This study evaluated how texting using a Head-Mounted Display, Google Glass, impacts driving performance. Experienced drivers performed a classic car-following task while using three different interfaces to text: fully manual interaction with a head-down smartphone, vocal interaction with a smartphone, and vocal interaction with Google Glass. Fully manual interaction produced worse driving performance than either of the other interaction methods… CONTINUE READING

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