Textile dermatitis in patients with contact sensitization in Israel: a 4‐year prospective study

@article{Lazarov2004TextileDI,
  title={Textile dermatitis in patients with contact sensitization in Israel: a 4‐year prospective study},
  author={Aneta Lazarov},
  journal={Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology},
  year={2004},
  volume={18}
}
  • A. Lazarov
  • Published 1 September 2004
  • Medicine
  • Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
Background  The exact incidence of textile dermatitis is unknown because of the lack of controlled epidemiological studies. Nevertheless, the increasing frequency of contact dermatitis to clothing has been demonstrated, thus indicating the importance of further investigations in this field. 

Clinical and epidemiological features of textile contact dermatitis:an Italian multicentre study

The prevalence of occupational and non‐occupational textile dermatitis seems to be increasing, probably because of changed textile manufacturing techniques.

Is contact allergy to disperse dyes and related substances associated with textile dermatitis?

Background  Disperse dyes (DDs) are the most common sensitizers among textile dyes, but there is little knowledge of the clinical relevance of positive patch test reactions.

Dermatologic Surgical Implications of Allergic Contact Dermatitis

  • S. JacobA. AmadoD. Cohen
  • Medicine
    Dermatologic surgery : official publication for American Society for Dermatologic Surgery [et al.]
  • 2005
The clinician is alerted to the most common allergens associated with the use of surgical products to lead to early diagnosis and allergen avoidance.

Dermatologic surgical implications of allergic contact dermatitis.

The purpose of this article is to alert the clinician to the most common allergens associated with the use of surgical products to lead to early diagnosis and allergen avoidance.

Occupational Contact Dermatitis: An Update.

Clinical Features of Contact Dermatitis

Clinical features of contact dermatitis include the symptoms: pruritus, stinging, smarting, and pain. The typical clinical finding is dermatitis at the site of contact with the offending object.

Bikini textile contact dermatitis: A Sherlockian approach revealing 2,4‐dichlorophenol as a potential textile contact allergen

Different textile constituents may act as allergens and/or irritants and provoke textile contact dermatitis (TCD).

Textile allergic contact dermatitis: current status

There are many challenges to correctly identifying the offending textile products in a patient with suspected textile dye dermatitis, and counseling the patient on how to avoid the textile products most likely to cause a recurrence of ACD skin lesions is complicated.

Allergic Contact Dermatitis Induced by Textile Necklace

Despite the European legislation and the reduced use of disperse dyes in Third World countries, disperse azo dyes still induce new cases of allergic contact dermatitis.
...

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