Textile Extensification, Alienation, and Social Stratification in Ancient Mesopotamia1

@article{McCorriston1997TextileEA,
  title={Textile Extensification, Alienation, and Social Stratification in Ancient Mesopotamia1},
  author={Joy McCorriston},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={1997},
  volume={38},
  pages={517 - 535}
}
One of the most significant transformations in the emergence of economically and socially complex societies has been the development of social groups with differential access to productive resources. Anthropologists have puzzled over the number of empirical cases suggesting that women have disproportionately lost access to productive resources. This paper follows one such case—the development of textile workshops in Mesopotamia—to offer new insights into the alienation of women producers in the… Expand
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