Text‐based interactivity in candidate campaign web sites: A case study from the 2002 elections

@article{Endres2004TextbasedII,
  title={Text‐based interactivity in candidate campaign web sites: A case study from the 2002 elections},
  author={Danielle Endres and Barbara Warnick},
  journal={Western Journal of Communication},
  year={2004},
  volume={68},
  pages={322 - 342}
}
OVER THE COURSE of the past decade, the World Wide Web has played a progressively increasing role in political campaigning. Gary Selnow (1998) noted that 1996 was the first year that political campaigns used the Web for mass campaigning, since then its use has increased dramatically in local, state, and federal elections (Benoit & Benoit, 2000; Bimber, 1998; D'Alessio, 1997, 2000; Dulio, Goff, & Thurber 1999; Poupolo, 2001; Schneider & Foot, 2002; Whillock, 1997). By early summer 2003, for… 
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