Tests of Null Models for Amphibian Declines on a Tropical Mountain

@article{Pounds1997TestsON,
  title={Tests of Null Models for Amphibian Declines on a Tropical Mountain},
  author={J. Alan Pounds and Michael P. L. Fogden and Jay Mathers Savage and George C. Gorman},
  journal={Conservation Biology},
  year={1997},
  volume={11}
}
Many of the recent, widespread declines and disappearances of amphibian populations have taken place in seemingly undisturbed, montane habitats. The question of whether the observed patterns differ from those expected from natural population dynamics is the subject of an ongoing controversy with important implications for conservation. We examined this issue for the Monteverde region of Costa Rica’s Cordillera de Tilarán, where a multi‐species population crash in 1987 led to the disappearance… 
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