Testosterone levels in dominant sociable males are lower than in solitary roamers: physiological differences between three male reproductive tactics in a sociably flexible mammal.

@article{Schradin2009TestosteroneLI,
  title={Testosterone levels in dominant sociable males are lower than in solitary roamers: physiological differences between three male reproductive tactics in a sociably flexible mammal.},
  author={Carsten Schradin and Michael Scantlebury and Neville Pillay and Barbara K{\"o}nig},
  journal={The American naturalist},
  year={2009},
  volume={173 3},
  pages={376-88}
}
The relative plasticity hypothesis predicts that alternative tactics are associated with changes in steroid hormone levels. In species with alternative male reproductive tactics, the highest androgen levels have usually been reported in dominant males. However, in sociable species, dominant males show amicable behaviors to gain access to females, which might conflict with high testosterone levels. We compared testosterone, corticosterone, and resting metabolic rate in male striped mice… CONTINUE READING