Testosterone facilitates aggression by modulating vasopressin receptors in the hypothalamus

@article{Delville1996TestosteroneFA,
  title={Testosterone facilitates aggression by modulating vasopressin receptors in the hypothalamus},
  author={Yvon Delville and Karim M. Mansour and Craig F. Ferris},
  journal={Physiology \& Behavior},
  year={1996},
  volume={60},
  pages={25-29}
}
In many species, testosterone treatment facilitates offensive aggression tested in resident-intruder models. As the mechanisms of action of testosterone remain unclear, we hypothesized that testosterone interacts with neurotransmitter systems involved in the regulation of offensive aggression. We tested this hypothesis with the vasopressinergic system in golden hamsters in three separate experiments. First, we compared the density of V1 vasopressin (VAP) receptor binding between castrated… Expand
Serotonin blocks vasopressin-facilitated offensive aggression: Interactions within the ventrolateral hypothalamus of golden hamsters
TLDR
Testosterone-treated male golden hamsters received IP injections of fluoxetine, a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, or vehicle 1 h prior to AVP microinjections within the ventrolateral hypothalamus (VLH) to test whether AVP-facilitated behavior is also inhibited by serotonin treatment. Expand
Arginine‐vasopressin and the regulation of aggression in female Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus)
TLDR
Contrary to what is observed in males, these data suggest that AVP in the AH may play an inhibitory role on aggression in female Syrian hamsters. Expand
Vasopressin/Serotonin Interactions in the Anterior Hypothalamus Control Aggressive Behavior in Golden Hamsters
TLDR
The present studies examine the neuroanatomical and neurochemical interaction between AVP and 5-HT at the level of the anterior hypothalamus (AH) in the control of offensive aggression in Syrian golden hamsters to suggest that5-HT inhibits fighting, in part, by antagonizing the aggression-promoting action of the AVP system. Expand
Sexual differences in vasopressin receptor binding within the ventrolateral hypothalamus in golden hamsters
TLDR
The results show that adult female golden hamsters are equally capable as males of expressing high levels of AVP receptor binding in the VLH in response to high Levels of testosterone, suggesting differences are not related to differential responsiveness to testosterone, but rather to a differential production and availability of the hormone. Expand
Effects of neural androgen receptor disruption on aggressive behavior, arginine vasopressin and galanin systems in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis and lateral septum.
TLDR
The present findings indicate that the neural AR is required in the expression of aggressive behavior but not in the sexual differentiation of AVP and galanin cell number in the BNST and fiber immunoreactivity in the lateral septum, and suggest that AR in the nervous system could mediate activational effects of testosterone in the regulation ofaggressive behavior during adulthood. Expand
Repeated Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Treatment during Adolescence Increases Vasopressin V1A Receptor Binding in Syrian Hamsters: Correlation with Offensive Aggression
TLDR
It is suggested that adolescent anabolic steroid exposure may facilitate offensive aggression by increasing vasopressin V(1A) receptor binding in several key areas of the hamster brain. Expand
Behavioral and Neurobiological Consequences of Social Subjugation during Puberty in Golden Hamsters
TLDR
The results establish puberty as a developmental period sensitive to environmental stressors and show that changes in the vasopressin and serotonin systems can correlate with behavioral alterations, supporting the role of these two neurotransmitters in the regulation of aggression. Expand
Anterior hypothalamic vasopressin modulates the aggression-stimulating effects of adolescent cocaine exposure in Syrian hamsters
TLDR
It is suggested that adolescent cocaine exposure increases aggression by increasing stimulated release of vasopressin in the anterior hypothalamus, providing direct evidence for a causal role of anterior hypothalamic-vasopressingin activity in adolescent cocaine-induced offensive aggression. Expand
Repeated agonistic encounters in hamsters modulate AVP V1a receptor binding
TLDR
AVP V1a binding in the VMHL correlates with, and may modulate, the behavioral changes that occur following repeated experiences of victory, and appears to be independent of testosterone levels. Expand
Individual differences in estrogen receptor α in select brain nuclei are associated with individual differences in aggression
TLDR
It is suggested that estrogens modulate aggressive behavior by acting on a circuit that includes the LS, vBNST, and AHA and that the source of estrogens is non-gonadal. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 34 REFERENCES
Vasopressin receptor blockade in the anterior hypothalamus suppresses aggression in hamsters
TLDR
Data suggest that vasopressin-sensitive neurons in the anterior hypothalamus are involved in the control of intraspecific aggression in male hamsters. Expand
Vasopressin and serotonin interactions in the control of agonistic behavior
TLDR
In hamsters, dominant/subordinate relationships are initially determined by overt aggression, but subsequently communicated by flank marking, an arginine vasopressin (AVP)-dependent behavior, which is possible that the reduction of aggression observed in castrated hamsters is due to a loss of AVP responsiveness in the VLH. Expand
Medial amygdala and aggressive behavior: Interaction between testosterone and vasopressin
This paper considers the functional significance of the testosterone-dependent vasopressinergic neurons of the medial amygdala (Ame) in intermale aggressive behavior of rats. Local microinfusion ofExpand
Intraspecific aggression in male hamsters is inhibited by intrahypothalamic vasopressin-receptor antagonist
TLDR
The results confirm the earlier work showing that AVP-receptor antagonist reduces intraspecific aggression and suggest that hamsters microinjected into the anterior hypothalamus with an AVP, receptor antagonist also elicit less aggression from conspecifics. Expand
Gonadal steroids regulate oxytocin receptors but not vasopressin receptors in the brain of male and female rats. An autoradiographical study
The distribution and the amount of [3H]oxytocin binding were studied in the brain of adult rats of either sex, as well as in male and female castrates, some of which received injections of estradiolExpand
Gonadal influence on agonistic behavior in the male domestic rat.
TLDR
The expression of agonistic behavior was potentiated by androgen; aggressiveness and dominance were also greatly influenced by residence in the home cage. Expand
Effects of intracranial implants of testosterone propionate on intermale aggression in the castrated male mouse.
TLDR
The results would indicate that the septum is important in the control of androgen-dependent, intermale aggression in the male CF-1 mouse. Expand
Sex differences in hormonal responses of vasopressin pathways in the rat brain.
TLDR
The results indicate that the sex difference in the steroid-sensitive AVP pathways depends on other factors besides circulating hormone levels in adulthood. Expand
Aggression induced by stimulation of the hypothalamus: Effects of androgens
TLDR
It is demonstrated that, to induce the same aggressive responses, in absence of androgens more electrical current is needed than when these hormones are present in the general circulation of the ESH stimulated animals. Expand
Ethology and pharmacology of hypothalamic aggression in the rat
  • M. Kruk
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews
  • 1992
TLDR
It is suggested that further study of the ethopharmacology of hypothalamic responses may shed light on the pathophysiology of impulsive behavioural symptoms which in man seem to be beyond the control of appraisal or context. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...