Testosterone and paternal care in East African foragers and pastoralists

@article{Muller2008TestosteroneAP,
  title={Testosterone and paternal care in East African foragers and pastoralists},
  author={Martin N. Muller and Frank W. Marlowe and Revocatus Bugumba and Peter T Ellison},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2008},
  volume={276},
  pages={347 - 354}
}
The ‘challenge hypothesis’ posits that testosterone facilitates reproductive effort (investment in male–male competition and mate-seeking) at the expense of parenting effort (investment in offspring and mates). Multiple studies, primarily in North America, have shown that men in committed relationships, fathers, or both maintain lower levels of testosterone than unpaired men. Data from non-western populations, however, show inconsistent results. We hypothesized that much of this cross-cultural… Expand

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