Testosterone and cortisol jointly regulate dominance: Evidence for a dual-hormone hypothesis

@article{Mehta2010TestosteroneAC,
  title={Testosterone and cortisol jointly regulate dominance: Evidence for a dual-hormone hypothesis},
  author={P. Mehta and R. Josephs},
  journal={Hormones and Behavior},
  year={2010},
  volume={58},
  pages={898-906}
}
Traditional theories propose that testosterone should increase dominance and other status-seeking behaviors, but empirical support has been inconsistent. The present research tested the hypothesis that testosterone's effect on dominance depends on cortisol, a glucocorticoid hormone implicated in psychological stress and social avoidance. In the domains of leadership (Study 1, mixed-sex sample) and competition (Study 2, male-only sample), testosterone was positively related to dominance, but… Expand
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