Testosterone Rapidly Increases Neural Reactivity to Threat in Healthy Men: A Novel Two-Step Pharmacological Challenge Paradigm

@article{Goetz2014TestosteroneRI,
  title={Testosterone Rapidly Increases Neural Reactivity to Threat in Healthy Men: A Novel Two-Step Pharmacological Challenge Paradigm},
  author={Stefan M. M. Goetz and Lingfei Tang and Moriah E. Thomason and Michael P Diamond and Ahmad R. Hariri and Justin M. Carr{\'e}},
  journal={Biological Psychiatry},
  year={2014},
  volume={76},
  pages={324-331}
}
BACKGROUND Previous research suggests that testosterone (T) plays a key role in shaping competitive and aggressive behavior in humans, possibly by modulating threat-related neural circuitry. However, this research has been limited by the use of T augmentation that fails to account for baseline differences and has been conducted exclusively in women. Thus, the extent to which normal physiologic concentrations of T affect threat-related brain function in men remains unknown. METHODS In the… Expand

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