Testing the testing effect in the classroom

@article{McDaniel2007TestingTT,
  title={Testing the testing effect in the classroom},
  author={Mark A. McDaniel and Janis L. Anderson and Mary H. Derbish and Nova Morrisette},
  journal={European Journal of Cognitive Psychology},
  year={2007},
  volume={19},
  pages={494 - 513}
}
Laboratory studies show that taking a test on studied material promotes subsequent learning and retention of that material on a final test (termed the testing effect). Educational research has virtually ignored testing as a technique to improve classroom learning. We investigated the testing effect in a college course. Students took weekly quizzes followed by multiple choice criterial tests (unit tests and a cumulative final). Weekly quizzes included multiple choice or short answer questions… 
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