Testing the roles of species in mixed-species bird flocks of a Sri Lankan rain forest

@article{Goodale2005TestingTR,
  title={Testing the roles of species in mixed-species bird flocks of a Sri Lankan rain forest},
  author={Eben Goodale and S. Kotagama},
  journal={Journal of Tropical Ecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={21},
  pages={669 - 676}
}
Studies of mixed-species bird flocks have found that ‘nuclear’ species, those important to flock coherence, are either intraspecifically gregarious or are ‘sentinel’ species highly sensitive to predators. Both types of species are present in flocks of a Sri Lankan rain forest: orange-billed babblers (Turdoides rufescens Blyth) are highly gregarious, whereas greater racket-tailed drongos (Dicrurus paradiseus Linnaeus) are less so, but more sensitive and reliable alarm-callers. We hypothesized… Expand
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