Testing the impact of miniaturization on phylogeny: Paleozoic dissorophoid amphibians.

@article{Frbisch2009TestingTI,
  title={Testing the impact of miniaturization on phylogeny: Paleozoic dissorophoid amphibians.},
  author={N. Fr{\"o}bisch and R. Schoch},
  journal={Systematic biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={58 3},
  pages={
          312-27
        }
}
Among the diverse clade of Paleozoic dissorophoid amphibians, the small, terrestrial amphibamids and the neotenic branchiosaurids have frequently been suggested as possible antecedents of either all or some of the modern amphibian clades. Classically, amphibamids and branchiosaurids have been considered to represent distinct, but closely related clades within dissorophoids, but despite their importance for the controversial lissamphibian origins, a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of small… Expand
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