Testing hypotheses of language replacement in the Caucasus: evidence from the Y-chromosome

@article{Nasidze2002TestingHO,
  title={Testing hypotheses of language replacement in the Caucasus: evidence from the Y-chromosome},
  author={Ivan Nasidze and Tamara Sarkisian and A. N. Kerimov and Mark Stoneking},
  journal={Human Genetics},
  year={2002},
  volume={112},
  pages={255-261}
}
A previous analysis of mtDNA variation in the Caucasus found that Indo-European-speaking Armenians and Turkic-speaking Azerbaijanians were more closely related genetically to other Caucasus populations (who speak Caucasian languages) than to other Indo-European or Turkic groups, respectively. Armenian and Azerbaijanian therefore represent language replacements, possibly via elite dominance involving primarily male migrants, in which case genetic relationships of Armenians and Azerbaijanians… Expand
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