Testing different interpretations for the mistaken belief that rays exit the eyes during vision.

Abstract

Research has shown that children and adults believe that emissions from the eye occur during the act of vision. Such beliefs are similar to ancient extramission theories of perception. In Study 1, the authors tested the idea that extramission beliefs might stem from people's thinking about what might occur during vision as opposed to what is necessary for seeing. Training participants to think about what is necessary for vision, however, had no effect on extramission responses. The results of Study 2 indicated that emphasizing the idea of visual input led to a decline in extramission responses and supported the hypothesis that extramission notions stem from the outer-oriented phenomenology of vision.

Cite this paper

@article{Winer2003TestingDI, title={Testing different interpretations for the mistaken belief that rays exit the eyes during vision.}, author={Gerald A Winer and Aaron W. Rader and Jane E Cottrell}, journal={The Journal of psychology}, year={2003}, volume={137 3}, pages={243-61} }