Testing a family intervention hypothesis: the contribution of mother-infant skin-to-skin contact (kangaroo care) to family interaction, proximity, and touch.

@article{Feldman2003TestingAF,
  title={Testing a family intervention hypothesis: the contribution of mother-infant skin-to-skin contact (kangaroo care) to family interaction, proximity, and touch.},
  author={Ruth Feldman and Aron Weller and Lea Sirota and Arthur Isaac Eidelman},
  journal={Journal of family psychology : JFP : journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association},
  year={2003},
  volume={17 1},
  pages={94-107}
}
The provision of maternal-infant body contact during a period of maternal separation was examined for its effects on parent-infant and triadic interactions. Participants were 146 three-month-old preterm infants and their parents, half of whom received skin-to-skin contact, or kangaroo care (KC), in the neonatal nursery. Global relational style and micro-patterns of proximity and touch were coded. Following KC, mothers and fathers were more sensitive and less intrusive, infants showed less… CONTINUE READING