Testing a complete-diet model for estimating the land resource requirements of food consumption and agricultural carrying capacity: The New York State example

@article{Peters2007TestingAC,
  title={Testing a complete-diet model for estimating the land resource requirements of food consumption and agricultural carrying capacity: The New York State example},
  author={Christian J. Peters and J. Wilkins and G. W. Fick},
  journal={Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems},
  year={2007},
  volume={22},
  pages={145 - 153}
}
Abstract Agriculture faces a multitude of challenges in the 21st century, and new tools are needed to help determine how it should respond. Among these challenges is a need to reconcile how human food consumption patterns should change to both improve human nutrition and reduce agriculture's environmental footprint. A complete-diet framework is needed for better understanding how diet influences demand for a fundamental agricultural resource, land. We tested such a model, measuring the impact… Expand
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