Testifying while black: An experimental study of court reporter accuracy in transcription of African American English

@article{Jones2019TestifyingWB,
  title={Testifying while black: An experimental study of court reporter accuracy in transcription of African American English},
  author={Taylor Jones and Taylor Jessica Rose Ryan Robin Kalbfeld and T. Hancock and Taylor Jessica Rose Ryan Robin Clark},
  journal={Language},
  year={2019},
  volume={95},
  pages={e216 - e252}
}
Abstract:Court reporters are certified at either 95% or 98% accuracy, depending on their certifying organization; however, the measure of accuracy is not one that evaluates their ability to transcribe nonstandard dialects. Here, we demonstrate that Philadelphia court reporters consistently fail to meet this level of transcription accuracy when confronted with mundane examples of spoken African American English (AAE). Furthermore, we show that they often cannot demonstrate understanding of what… Expand
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