Territory and breeding density in the Great Tit

@inproceedings{Krebs1971TerritoryAB,
  title={Territory and breeding density in the Great Tit},
  author={John Richard Krebs},
  year={1971}
}
A movable bridge connector providing in active position a continuous contact surface between spaced apart sections of a phase conductor at a switching station of a current collecting system. The connector comprises a rod pivotally mounted at one end thereof to the end of one of the sections, preferably a fixed section, and locking means cooperating with the end of the other section, preferably the movable section, to ensure the precise positioning and latching of the rod in active position so… 
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The utility of the definition of territory proposed by Davies (1978) was tested by applying it to an analysis of spacing behavior in voles, Clethrionomys rufocanus bedfordiae (Thomas), suggesting that, by this definition, adult females had territories in both winter and spring, while adult males had them only in winter.
The Effects of Habitat Geometry on Territorial Defense Costs: Intruder Pressure in Bounded Habitats
TLDR
Data from empirical studies of territorial species agree with many of the direct and indirect qualitative predictions of these models, and the effects of habitat geometry on defense costs may be important in many territorial species, and should be taken into account in future studies.
Territorial defence in the great tit (Parus major): Do residents always win?
  • J. Krebs
  • Biology
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2004
TLDR
I removed resident pairs of great tits from their territories for short periods and released them after replacement pairs had occupied the spaces, consistent with the hypothesis that territorial residents win in contests against intruders because of an asymmetry in payoff rather than an asymmetric in resource holding potential or an arbitary convention.
The role of nest-site availability and territorial behaviour in limiting the breeding density of Kestrels
TLDR
During 1976-9 European kestrels in an upland area of young conifer plantation in south Scotland bred mainly in disused crow Corvus corone nests, usually in small woods in the valleys, and fed largely on voles.
Population fluctuations and survival of Great Tits Par us major dependent on food supplied by man in winter
TLDR
During low predation years the adult survival rate was negatively related to the number of fledglings produced per pair; this suggests that investment in descendants is a substantial survival cost for reproducing individuals.
Territory Size in the White-Crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys): Measurement and Stability
TLDR
Both standard mapping procedure and stimulus procedure are used to delimit territories and to estimate their stability throughout a breeding season.
Regulation of numbers in the Great tit (Aves: Passeriformes)
TLDR
The census data of the Great tit collected by Perrins (1965) and others in Marley Wood are analysed for density-dependence and Territorial behaviour has been shown experimentally to determine breeding density, and may produce a density-dependent effect outside the breeding season.
Removal of territory holders causes influx of small-sized intruders in passerine bird communities in northern Finland
TLDR
The results suggest that breeding numbers in northern migrant bird populations are limited by territoriality and competition both within and among populations may occur more commonly than usually thought.
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References

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TERRITORIAL BEHAVIOUR IN BARNACLE SETTLEMENT
TLDR
An analysis of the natural pattern of settlement of barnacles, whether arranged along a groove or over a plane area, shows that later settlers tend to maintain a distance from earlier settlers, analogous to territorial behaviour in active species.
On territorial behavior and other factors influencing habitat distribution in birds
TLDR
This study provides a valid example of how the problem can be approached and offers a first step in the eventual identification of the role of territorial behavior in the habitat distribution of a common species.
Evidence for the Concepts of Home Range and Territory in Stream Fishes
TLDR
The present work attempts to interpret a population of stream fishes as the result of competition among the individuals of which it is composed, and shows that many stream fishes live in very restricted areas during most, if not all, of their lifetime.
Experiments on Population Control by Territorial Behaviour in Red Grouse
TLDR
Experiments were undertaken to test whether males which were not occupying territories could become territorial if the established territory owners were removed, and whether the number of breeding males was being limited simply by the territorial accommodation available or by some deficiency in the unsuccessful birds.
Sizes of Feeding Territories among Birds
TLDR
The smaller spatial needs for omnivorous and herbivorous birds of a given biomass and perhaps the greater patchiness of their food when compared to predators are used to explain the higher occurrence of gregarious nesting in the former group.
The ecology of blackbird (Agelaius) social systems.
TLDR
All features of social systems are considered to be the products of natural selection just as are any physiological or morphological adaptations.
Aggression and Self-Regulation of Population Size in Deermice
TLDR
It is concluded that the correlation he drew between adult aggressiveness and juvenile survival is real, and the data collected support Sadleir's hypothesis, and some clues to the organization of deermouse populations are provided.
BUD-EATING BY BULLFINCHES IN RELATION TO THE NATURAL FOOD-SUPPLY
TLDR
The extent of damage in different years is considered in relation to the populations and food-supply of the bullfinch in deciduous woodland, the natural habitat, and the bud-eating habits of bullfinches.
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