Territory acquisition in loons: the importance of take-over

@article{Piper2000TerritoryAI,
  title={Territory acquisition in loons: the importance of take-over},
  author={Walter Piper and Keren B. Tischler and Margaret Klich},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2000},
  volume={59},
  pages={385-394}
}
We examined patterns of territory acquisition and reconnaissance in common loons, Gavia immer, from northern Wisconsin. Among all territory acquisitions, 41.5% occurred through passive occupation of territories left vacant after the death or desertion of a previous resident, 17% constituted founding of new territories and the remaining 41.5% came about through take-over: either usurpation of defended territories or appropriation of territories before the seasonal return of previous owners. Take… Expand
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