Territoriality in the green frog (Rana clamitans): Vocalizations and agonistic behaviour

@article{Wells1978TerritorialityIT,
  title={Territoriality in the green frog (Rana clamitans): Vocalizations and agonistic behaviour},
  author={Kentwood D. Wells},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1978},
  volume={26},
  pages={1051-1063}
}
  • K. Wells
  • Published 1 November 1978
  • Geography
  • Animal Behaviour
Abstract Territorial behaviour of Rana clamitans was studied in an experimental pond containing natural vegetation and artificial shelters. Males defended territories from June through August. Five vocalizations were used in territorial advertisement and agonistic encounters. Agonistic behaviour included patrolling, splashing displays, chases, attacks and wrestling. About 23% of all encounters ended in wrestling bouts. Most bouts were less than 30 s long, but some lasted up to 45 min. Most… Expand
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