Territoriality evidenced by asymmetric intruder–holder motivation in an amblypygid

@article{Chapin2016TerritorialityEB,
  title={Territoriality evidenced by asymmetric intruder–holder motivation in an amblypygid},
  author={K. Chapin and Sloan Hill-Lindsay},
  journal={Behavioural Processes},
  year={2016},
  volume={122},
  pages={110-115}
}
Territoriality has an extensive and thorough history of research, but has been difficult to impossible to test empirically in most species. We offer a method for testing for territoriality by measuring the motivation of territory intruders to win contests in controlled trials. We demonstrated this approach by staging paired trials of the Amblypygi Phrynus longipes (Chelicerata: Arachnida). Amblypygids engaged in agonistic interactions after the opportunity to establish a putative territory on… Expand

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