Territorial defence in the speckled wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria): The resident always wins

@article{Davies1978TerritorialDI,
  title={Territorial defence in the speckled wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria): The resident always wins},
  author={N. Davies},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1978},
  volume={26},
  pages={138-147}
}
  • N. Davies
  • Published 1978
  • Biology
  • Animal Behaviour
Abstract Males competed for territories, spots of sunlight on the ground layer of woodland, which were the best places for finding females. At any one time only 60% of the males had territories; the remainder patrolled for females up in the tree canopy. Males continually flew down from the canopy and rapidly took over vacant sunspots. However, if the sunspot was already occupied, then the intruder was always driven back by the owner. Experiments showed that this was true even if the owner had… Expand
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