Terminal digit preference: beware of Benford’s law

@article{Beer2009TerminalDP,
  title={Terminal digit preference: beware of Benford’s law},
  author={T. Beer},
  journal={Journal of Clinical Pathology},
  year={2009},
  volume={62},
  pages={192 - 192}
}
  • T. Beer
  • Published 2009
  • Medicine
  • Journal of Clinical Pathology
  • Recording numerical data in pathology reports is routine and in some cases may provide valuable prognostic data (eg, tumour size for cancer staging). Hayes has recently observed that there is a tendency for reporters to favour 0 and 5 as the last digits in measurements “terminal digit preference”.1 This is perhaps not surprising as gross measurements are often approximations taken in a relatively imprecise fashion (eg, holding a ruler to an irregularly shaped and flexible tissue sample), and… CONTINUE READING
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