Terminal Pleistocene Alaskan genome reveals first founding population of Native Americans

@article{MorenoMayar2018TerminalPA,
  title={Terminal Pleistocene Alaskan genome reveals first founding population of Native Americans},
  author={J. V. Moreno-Mayar and B. Potter and L. Vinner and Matthias Steinr{\"u}cken and S. Rasmussen and Jonathan Terhorst and J. Kamm and A. Albrechtsen and Anna-Sapfo Malaspinas and M. Sikora and J. Reuther and J. Irish and R. Malhi and L. Orlando and Y. Song and R. Nielsen and D. J. Meltzer and E. Willerslev},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2018},
  volume={553},
  pages={203-207}
}
Despite broad agreement that the Americas were initially populated via Beringia, the land bridge that connected far northeast Asia with northwestern North America during the Pleistocene epoch, when and how the peopling of the Americas occurred remains unresolved. Analyses of human remains from Late Pleistocene Alaska are important to resolving the timing and dispersal of these populations. The remains of two infants were recovered at Upward Sun River (USR), and have been dated to around 11.5… Expand
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