Ten species in one: DNA barcoding reveals cryptic species in the neotropical skipper butterfly Astraptes fulgerator.

@article{Hebert2004TenSI,
  title={Ten species in one: DNA barcoding reveals cryptic species in the neotropical skipper butterfly Astraptes fulgerator.},
  author={Paul D. N. Hebert and Erin H Penton and John M. Burns and Daniel H. Janzen and Winnie Hallwachs},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2004},
  volume={101 41},
  pages={
          14812-7
        }
}
Astraptes fulgerator, first described in 1775, is a common and widely distributed neotropical skipper butterfly (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae). [...] Key Result We combine 25 years of natural history observations in northwestern Costa Rica with morphological study and DNA barcoding of museum specimens to show that A. fulgerator is a complex of at least 10 species in this region.Expand

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