Ten Misconceptions from the History of Analysis and Their Debunking

@article{Blaszczyk2013TenMF,
  title={Ten Misconceptions from the History of Analysis and Their Debunking},
  author={P. Blaszczyk and M. Katz and David Sherry},
  journal={Foundations of Science},
  year={2013},
  volume={18},
  pages={43-74}
}
The widespread idea that infinitesimals were “eliminated” by the “great triumvirate” of Cantor, Dedekind, and Weierstrass is refuted by an uninterrupted chain of work on infinitesimal-enriched number systems. The elimination claim is an oversimplification created by triumvirate followers, who tend to view the history of analysis as a pre-ordained march toward the radiant future of Weierstrassian epsilontics. In the present text, we document distortions of the history of analysis stemming from… Expand

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