Temporary Jobs: Stepping Stones or Dead Ends?

@article{Booth2000TemporaryJS,
  title={Temporary Jobs: Stepping Stones or Dead Ends?},
  author={Alison Booth and Marco Francesconi and Jeff Frank},
  journal={Labor: Personnel Economics},
  year={2000}
}
In Britain about 7% of male employees and 10% of female employees are in temporary jobs. In contrast to much of continental Europe, this proportion has been relatively stable over the 1990s. Using data from the British Household Panel Survey, we find that temporary workers report lower levels of job satisfaction, receive less work-related training, and are less well-paid than their counterparts in permanent employment. However, there is evidence that fixed-term contracts are a stepping stone to… 
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