Temporal variation of the microbial community associated with the mediterranean sponge Aplysina aerophoba

@article{Friedrich2001TemporalVO,
  title={Temporal variation of the microbial community associated with the mediterranean sponge Aplysina aerophoba},
  author={A. Friedrich and I. Fischer and P. Proksch and J. Hacker and U. Hentschel},
  journal={FEMS Microbiology Ecology},
  year={2001},
  volume={38},
  pages={105-113}
}
Sponges of the Aplysinidae family contain large amounts of bacteria that are embedded within the sponge tissue matrix. In order to determine the stability and specificity of the Aplysina–microbe association, sponges were maintained in recirculating seawater aquariums for 11 days. One aquarium was left untreated, a second one contained 0.45 μm filtered seawater (starvation conditions) and the third one contained 0.45 μm filtered seawater plus antibiotics (antibiotics exposure). Changes in the… Expand
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