Temporal trends in sperm count: a systematic review and meta-regression analysis

@article{Levine2017TemporalTI,
  title={Temporal trends in sperm count: a systematic review and meta-regression analysis},
  author={Hagai Levine and Niels J{\o}rgensen and Anderson Joel Martino-Andrade and Jaime Mendiola and Dan Weksler-Derri and Irina Mindlis and Rachel Pinotti and Shanna Helen Swan},
  journal={Human Reproduction Update},
  year={2017},
  volume={23},
  pages={646–659}
}
BACKGROUND Reported declines in sperm counts remain controversial today and recent trends are unknown. [] Key MethodSEARCH METHODS PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for English language studies of human SC published in 1981-2013. Following a predefined protocol 7518 abstracts were screened and 2510 full articles reporting primary data on SC were reviewed.

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