Temporal Environmental Variability Drives the Evolution of Cooperative Breeding in Birds

@article{Rubenstein2007TemporalEV,
  title={Temporal Environmental Variability Drives the Evolution of Cooperative Breeding in Birds},
  author={Dustin R. Rubenstein and Irby J. Lovette},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2007},
  volume={17},
  pages={1414-1419}
}
Many vertebrates breed in cooperative groups in which more than two members provide care for young. Studies of cooperative breeding behavior within species have long highlighted the importance of environmental factors in mediating the paradox of why some such individuals delay independent breeding to help raise the offspring of others. In contrast, studies involving comparisons among species have not shown a similarly clear evolutionary-scale relationship between the interspecific incidence of… Expand
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