Templates in Chess Memory: A Mechanism for Recalling Several Boards

@article{Gobet1996TemplatesIC,
  title={Templates in Chess Memory: A Mechanism for Recalling Several Boards},
  author={Fernand R. Gobet and Herbert A. Simon},
  journal={Cognitive Psychology},
  year={1996},
  volume={31},
  pages={1-40}
}
This paper addresses empirically and theoretically a question derived from the chunking theory of memory (Chase & Simon, 1973a, 1973b): To what extent is skilled chess memory limited by the size of short-term memory (about seven chunks)? This question is addressed first with an experiment where subjects, ranking from class A players to grandmasters, are asked to recall up to five positions presented during 5 s each. Results show a decline of percentage of recall with additional boards, but also… 

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