Temperature shapes the costs, benefits and geographic diversification of sexual coloration in a dragonfly.

@article{Moore2019TemperatureST,
  title={Temperature shapes the costs, benefits and geographic diversification of sexual coloration in a dragonfly.},
  author={Michael P. Moore and Cassandra Lis and Iulian Gherghel and Ryan Andrew Martin},
  journal={Ecology letters},
  year={2019},
  volume={22 3},
  pages={
          437-446
        }
}
The environment shapes the evolution of secondary sexual traits by determining how their costs and benefits vary across the landscape. Given the thermal properties of dark coloration generally, temperature should crucially influence the costs, benefits and geographic diversification of many secondary sexual colour patterns. We tested this hypothesis using sexually selected wing coloration in a dragonfly. We find that greater wing coloration heats males - the magnitude of which improves flight… 
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