Temperature sensitivity of soil carbon decomposition and feedbacks to climate change

@article{Davidson2006TemperatureSO,
  title={Temperature sensitivity of soil carbon decomposition and feedbacks to climate change},
  author={Eric A. Davidson and Ivan A. Janssens},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2006},
  volume={440},
  pages={165-173}
}
Significantly more carbon is stored in the world's soils—including peatlands, wetlands and permafrost—than is present in the atmosphere. Disagreement exists, however, regarding the effects of climate change on global soil carbon stocks. If carbon stored belowground is transferred to the atmosphere by a warming-induced acceleration of its decomposition, a positive feedback to climate change would occur. Conversely, if increases of plant-derived carbon inputs to soils exceed increases in… Expand
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