Temperature adaptation and the contractile properties of live muscle fibres from teleost fish

@article{Johnson2004TemperatureAA,
  title={Temperature adaptation and the contractile properties of live muscle fibres from teleost fish},
  author={T. P. Johnson and I. Johnston},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Physiology B},
  year={2004},
  volume={161},
  pages={27-36}
}
SummaryThe contractile properties of swimming muscles have been investigated in marine teleosts from Antarctic (Trematomus lepidorhinus, Pseudochaenichthys georgianus), temperate (Pollachius virens, Limanda limanda, Agonis cataphractus, Callionymus lyra), and tropical (Abudefduf abdominalis, Thalassoma duperreyi) latitudes. Small bundles of fast twitch fibres were isolated from anterior myotomes and/or the pectoral fin adductor profundis muscle (m. add. p). Live fibre preparations were viable… Expand
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