Temperature, metabolic power and the evolution of endothermy

@article{Clarke2010TemperatureMP,
  title={Temperature, metabolic power and the evolution of endothermy},
  author={Andrew Clarke and Hans-O. P{\"o}rtner},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={2010},
  volume={85}
}
Endothermy has evolved at least twice, in the precursors to modern mammals and birds. The most widely accepted explanation for the evolution of endothermy has been selection for enhanced aerobic capacity. We review this hypothesis in the light of advances in our understanding of ATP generation by mitochondria and muscle performance. Together with the development of isotope‐based techniques for the measurement of metabolic rate in free‐ranging vertebrates these have confirmed the importance of… Expand
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