Television viewing, computer game playing, and Internet use and self-reported time to bed and time out of bed in secondary-school children.

@article{Bulck2004TelevisionVC,
  title={Television viewing, computer game playing, and Internet use and self-reported time to bed and time out of bed in secondary-school children.},
  author={Jan Van den Bulck},
  journal={Sleep},
  year={2004},
  volume={27},
  pages={101-104}
}
  • J. Bulck
  • Published 1 February 2004
  • Education
  • Sleep
Objective: To investigate the relationship between the presence of a television set, a gaming computer, and/or an Internet connection in the room of adolescents and television viewing, computer game playing, and Internet use on the one hand, and time to bed, time up, time spent in bed, and overall tiredness in first- and fourth-year secondary-school children on the other hand. Methods: A random sample of students from 15 schools in Flanders, Belgium, yielded 2546 children who completed a… 

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