Telephone-administered cognitive-behavioral therapy for the treatment of depressive symptoms in multiple sclerosis.

Abstract

This study examined the efficacy of an 8-week telephone-administered cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of depressive symptomatology in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The treatment, Coping with MS (CMS), included a patient workbook designed to structure the treatment, provide visual aids, and help with homework assignments. Thirty-two patients with MS, who scored at least 15 on the Profile of Mood States Depression-Dejection scale, were randomly assigned to either the telephone CMS or to a usual-care control (UCC) condition. Depressive symptomatology decreased significantly in the CMS condition compared with the UCC condition. Furthermore, adherence to interferon beta-1a, a disease-modifying medication for the treatment of MS, was significantly better at the 4-month follow-up among patients who received CMS as compared with those in the UCC condition.

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@article{Mohr2000TelephoneadministeredCT, title={Telephone-administered cognitive-behavioral therapy for the treatment of depressive symptoms in multiple sclerosis.}, author={David C Mohr and William H. Likosky and Andrew Bertagnolli and Donald E. Goodkin and J Van der Wende and Patrick M. Dwyer and Laura Dick}, journal={Journal of consulting and clinical psychology}, year={2000}, volume={68 2}, pages={356-61} }